The Kauai Garden Island Is Hype Deserves

Head quickly to Kauai before it suffers the same fate as Maui, which was once considered The underdeveloped Island Of Hawaii.

In the previous days, hordes of tourists — and the commercialism that inevitably follows – have invaded the pristine coast. Visit Garden Island, the most lush and beautiful of the Hawaiian Islands. Leave before he loses his virginity to the devastating developers who are already floating on his shores.

The oldest island in the chain — more than five million years old, compared to the Island of Hawaii, a young upstart with only a Million years — Kauai has almost as many superstitions as birthdays.

There is one who says that this is the birthplace of rainbows, which is undoubtedly true because they appear in abundance in the sky of the Island. This is one of my favorite superstitions because it captures the essence of the island: mystical, magical and colorful, with surreal treasures at both ends.

It is no coincidence that so many films are known for their magnificent settings — thorny birds, sapphire Hawaii, the adventurers of the Lost Ark, Pirates of the Caribbean, the classic South Pacific and, more recently, descendants — were filmed here. If you don’t do anything else, sit on the balcony of your hotel and look at the landscape.

How many times do you have the opportunity to literally see Mount Makana (better known as Bali Hai) from your window? This view alone is worth the detour. If you decide to explore the rest of the Island, there is a lot to see. And even better, so many ways to see it.

The famous Bali Hai of Kauai still enchants, even if it is now called Mount Makana. Photo by Victor Block

Whether you are circling it, flying over it, cycling over it or sailing through it, you know that you have reached paradise. The luxuriance is exquisite.

Green grass merges with green plants that flow into green bushes that grow in green forests and merge into green mountains. The eye often cannot distinguish one from the other. The Monotony of the colors is almost fascinating.

FOR MANY, KAUAI IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL OF THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS

At the edge of the island, translucent waters spawn white ice caps that playfully nibble on the mulatto-colored sand. At other times, the waves appear so strongly that they form a wall between them and the sea. For the shortest Moment, time and the waves stop, then the Moment breaks and time begins again and the waves collapse with overwhelming force, as if to assert their undisputed dominance over the territory.

One of the most personal links with the islands is the hike along the Nepalese coast on the north coast of the island, for which you now need a prior reservation. “Spiritual” is the most commonly used word to describe the experience. A friend who has traveled the world, from Nepal to New Zealand, calls the Nepalese coast the only place he always wants to come back to.

The 11-mile Trek begins at Ke’e Beach, at the northwestern tip of the island, and continues along a narrow and steep path that passes waterfalls and streams, mango trees and wild orchids, along towering cliffs and knife-tipped peaks, until it reaches nirvana The landscape there is so spectacular that it seems unreal. The day hike – more often a climbing on rocks and landslides — is not for the faint of heart or the heavy-footed.

Those who want to taste the trail without ordering the full route can opt for a two-mile aperitif from Ke’E to Hanakapiai Beach. Whenever I started lamenting my inability to navigate through the slippery rocks and protruding muddy roots (if you can plan your outing during a dry period, go for it), I spotted a nine-year-old using the muddy surface as a slide or a grandmother confidently leading the way with a makeshift cane. It was the young mother with a baby on her back who carefully walked around the rocks as if she were heading for a suburban walk that finally convinced me to keep my self-deprecating tears to myself.

But the experience was exhilarating. The way back was much easier and the view on the way was worth the somewhat tedious effort. For those who find these challenges unattractive, other modes of transport offer comparable, although less personal, links with the coast.

HIKING ON THE NEPALESE COAST OF KAUAI IS A TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCE

A helicopter tour along the coast offers an extraordinary insight, like a beautifully written summary of a book. Zodiac Raft rides allow you to visit the coast beach by Beach, chapter by chapter. But when you walk along the Nepalese coast, you become one with the story, immerse yourself in the characters and part of the book itself.

Another must-see that allows several methods Of exploration is Waimea Canyon, the “Grand Canyon of the Pacific”.”As you wind along the 3,600-foot-deep fracture, glimpses of the Christmas-colored splendor unfold. Red and orange tones of the desert tease the tropical green, hinting at the discouraging views of the Canyon ahead. Nevertheless, they arrive at the Waimea Canyon Lookout, unprepared for the immensity and grandeur that finally welcome them.

If you want a different perspective of this breathtaking Panorama, consider a helicopter tour that dives into the Canyon for even more breathtaking views, or choose one of the many kilometers of trails that take you on foot through the Canyon.

Not far away, another Vision of Wonder awaits you. Kalalau Lookout offers breathtaking views of the historic Hawaii Valley and the Nepalese coast from its vantage point at 4,000 feet. Looking beyond the overgrown canyons and razor-sharp cliffs, you can’t tell where the sea stops and the sky begins. I thought of another type of island transport when I imagined sailing a cloud from the coast to the sky.

HISTORICAL SITES ADD TO KAUAI’S SCENIC APPEAL

For many, Kauai’s greatest attraction lies in its natural splendor. However, if you can take your eyes off the beauty of the surroundings, there are indeed other attractions to enjoy. A trip around the Island of less than 100 miles will take you to several small towns that have remained unchanged since the mid-1800s.

Visit the Wai’oli Hui’ia Church and the mission house in Hanalei, where the first missionaries arrived in 1834. Stroll along the wooden sidewalks of Hanapepe and visit Shimonishi, a world-famous orchid shop with its original facade intact and a few species of orchids so rare that they are not even sold. Visit the 1913 lighthouse in the sleepy town of Kilauea, located at the northernmost point of all the Hawaiian Islands.

Visits to ancient Hula temples, lava holes and wet and dry caves rich in stories of Hawaiian Folklore all add to the Magic of Kauai.

Oh yes, another thing, Kauai also has more beaches than any of the other islands. However, the most beautiful beaches are located all year round in the southern resort area of Poipu. You will find that long white sandy beaches surround the Island, creating a beach blanket as welcoming as satin sheets and soft pillows at the end of a busy day.

But nothing is perfect and the island landscape, which, although it is not yet dominated by fast food establishments imported from the mainland, has recently been the victim of a few Starbucks.

But there is also good news here – large box stores have been banned and no building can be taller than an mature palm tree. So as long as you keep those palm trees at bay, you can also keep the buildings at bay.

Even if paradise is slightly imperfect, Kauai can come as close as possible to perfection.

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